How to making compost at home with full procedure

How to making compost is one of natures best mulches and soil amendments, you can use it instend of commer cial fertilizer. Making Composting is usefull in all gardent’s. Only in the very smallest gardens will be diffcult to find space for a compost heap and material to fill it. Oweners of such small plots could consider worm composting instead. Using making compost improves soil structures, texture and aeration and increases the soil water-holding capacity. Adding composting improve soil fertility and stinulates healthy root development inplants. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium will be produced natureally by the feeding of microorganisms. So few if any soil amendments will need to be added.

How to making compost

1¬† Backard composting –

If you have a yard and a balance of browns (fallen leaves or straw) and greens (grass clipping and food scraps), you have all you need to make  compost.

2.Worm composting (vermicomposting)-

If you have a tiny yard live in an apartment or have an abundace of food scraps this types of composting is for you.

Making Compost
Making Compost

3.Grasscying-

If you have grass clipping and don’t want to use them is a compost pile you comleave them on the lawn to decompose. Read about grasscyling for tips, techniques and benefits.

Study: Farm yard manure

Some common composting materials

Green– Grass clipping, soft, leafy plants including annual weeds, fruit and vegetables, uncooked kitchen waste, selected pest waste/bedding.

Brown– Pruings and hedge trimmings, woodchip, leaves, paper and card, strow, plant stems.

Accelerators and activators

Products such as ‘Garotta’ are sometimes added where green waste is in short supply. They contain high leaves of nitrogen (a nutrients found in green waste) but should not be necessary if green wasts is plentiful. It is also possible to parchase activaors containing carbon (a nutrinet found in brown woody waste), these are aimed at composting grass clipping or other green waste were there is insufficient brown waste.

Lime

People sometimes think you need to added lime to the compost heap, but there is no need to do so.

Making Compost
Making Compost

Tips quick Making compost

i) Any plant material that’s now dead can be composted. Adding meat and only food products is not recommended as they take longer to decompose.

ii) Leaves, old plants, fruit and veggie trimmings, weathered mulches and pulled weeds provide volume in a compost pite, which needs to be big-at least 3 square feet-to maintain moisture well.

iv) Veggie scrups are naturally moist, so compost pites that contain a lot of kitchen waste need to be layed or mixed with bulkier stuff to keep then from becoming slimy.

v) Turing a compost pite mixes and breaks up materials, which seeds decomposition. When it comes to turing, you can do as much or as little as you like, depending on your desired turnaround time.

vi) Covering new kitchen waste with 4 inches of plant material works well with little or no turning.

vii) Keep compost piles moist but not soggy.

viii) Add a few shovelfuls of soil your pile from time to time.

Compost Benefits the soils physical structure-

i) In heavy clay soils compost improves drainge and porosity of the soil.

ii) Makes sticky, heavy soil friable or workable.

iii) Helps soils resist compaction which helps roots penetrate the soil.

iii) In light sandy soils compost improves water retention.

Compost Benefits the soil chemistry

i) acts as a buffer to the soils ph modifying and stabilizing it.

ii) Provides some micro and macro nutrients.

iii) Helps soil hold nutrients in root zone- prevents leaching.

iv) Improves the effectiveness of other fertilizens both organic the soil chemical.

Compost Benefits the soil Biology

i) Provided habitat and food for benefical soil organisms from bacteria to earthworms.

ii) Improves res is tance to both plant disease and insect pests.

iii) Inoculates the soil with beneficial organisms such as nitrogen fixing bacteria.

Study : Agriculture cultivation

More study: Agriculture pest and disease

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